The Coast Legacy

Thank you for reviewing our “Legacy Tab”. It all started with Larry Beard’s vision in 1970. With just two trucks and a couple of forklifts, Larry built a team of experts and provided them with a mission. Simply put, “Mission Accomplished”! Larry’s tenure as Founder and CEO from 1970 until his passing in 2014 launched over five decades that the Coast teams have transported and built some of the most unique and complex projects of our time.

Coast Machinery Mover’s success historically and today, can be ascribed to our ability to efficiently tackle any project, large or small, because of our diversified personnel and passion for excellence. This “passion” is not hyperbole, Coast had the first Versa-Lift on the West Coast, some of the biggest gantry systems in the continental United States, and field personnel from different facets of the industry that allowed us to take on any project with confidence.

We are a “Legacy” company. Today’s Team continues the “Legacy”. Our employees today all receive a Legacy Ring upon their 10 Year Anniversary. At 20 years we add a Diamond to their Legacy Ring. Annually our employees vote for a Field and an Office Employee to receive Legacy Awards named in Larry Beard’s honor. Every day that our Field Staff leaves for projects, they pass a Legacy Memorial honoring Mr. Beard.

Thanks again for reviewing our “Legacy Tab” – be sure to click on the link to the video that shares moments with Larry discussing Coast and one of our most Signature Projects Operation “Homeward Bound”. Enjoy…

Steve Stone

President and CEO

Notable Projects From Coast’s History

2003

The Homeward Bound team contracted with Coast Machinery Movers to move the aircraft from San Bernardino to the Ronald Reagan Library in Simi Valley, California via heavy transport truck. The six-hour, 100 mile journey began at 11 p.m. June 20, 2003, and the airplane arrived at the Reagan Library at 5 a.m., the next morning.

The fuselage weighed about 60,000 pounds and was fitted with special dollies at the nose and main landing gear locations that could be rotated 90 degrees in either direction even with weights up to 300,000 lbs. The dollies also had built-in hydraulics so the fuselage could be lowered to within inches of the ground to go under overpasses and then be raised back up for up to 30 mph traveling speeds.

The fuselage was moved intact with a total length of approximately 150 feet and was set up to accommodate a maximum height restriction of 15′ 8″. All equipment that was used was certified by the California Highway Patrol. Coast Machinery Movers assisted in the moving and reassembly of Air force One upon arrival.

2003

The Homeward Bound team contracted with Coast Machinery Movers to move the aircraft from San Bernardino to the Ronald Reagan Library in Simi Valley, California via heavy transport truck. The six-hour, 100 mile journey began at 11 p.m. June 20, 2003, and the airplane arrived at the Reagan Library at 5 a.m., the next morning.

The fuselage weighed about 60,000 pounds and was fitted with special dollies at the nose and main landing gear locations that could be rotated 90 degrees in either direction even with weights up to 300,000 lbs. The dollies also had built-in hydraulics so the fuselage could be lowered to within inches of the ground to go under overpasses and then be raised back up for up to 30 mph traveling speeds.

The fuselage was moved intact with a total length of approximately 150 feet and was set up to accommodate a maximum height restriction of 15′ 8″. All equipment that was used was certified by the California Highway Patrol. Coast Machinery Movers assisted in the moving and reassembly of Air force One upon arrival.

2013

As part of an historic Moon Engine relocation, Coast removes, transports and relocations the F1 Engine to its new home! A mockup of a mighty moon engine took a short trip under moonlight, as it moved from its display of 35 years to a nearby outdoor pedestal in Los Angeles.

The 19-foot-tall (5.8 meters) Apollo F-1 engineering model was partially disassembled and then trucked the 3.3 miles (5.3 km) from outside the Canoga Park factory where the massive engines were assembled in the 1960s to Aerojet Rocketdyne’s facility in Chatsworth, Calif. The move preceded the company closing the plant by the end of the year.

2013

As part of an historic Moon Engine relocation, Coast removes, transports and relocations the F1 Engine to its new home! A mockup of a mighty moon engine took a short trip under moonlight, as it moved from its display of 35 years to a nearby outdoor pedestal in Los Angeles.

The 19-foot-tall (5.8 meters) Apollo F-1 engineering model was partially disassembled and then trucked the 3.3 miles (5.3 km) from outside the Canoga Park factory where the massive engines were assembled in the 1960s to Aerojet Rocketdyne’s facility in Chatsworth, Calif. The move preceded the company closing the plant by the end of the year.

CONTACT US

Coast is the supplier of choice for all of your Machinery Moving, Specialty Rigging, Construction Services and Crating and Packaging needs.

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CONTACT US

Coast is the supplier of choice for your Crating & Packaging, Specialty Rigging, and Construction Services needs.

Thank you for your message. It has been sent.
There was an error trying to send your message. Please try again later.